How should schools teach about climate change, about sexuality?

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AUSTIN, Texas – This week, the Texas Board of Education is examining how colleges are teaching about climate change and sexuality.


What would you like to know

  • The board heard public testimony on Wednesday about proposed changes to eighth grade science guidelines
  • As part of the proposed program, students are expected to learn how “natural events and human activity can impact the global climate”.
  • He also refused to adopt on a preliminary basis health teaching materials in middle and secondary schools on topics such as contraception, gender identity and self-harm.
  • All of this comes as the battle over what some consider “inappropriate content” in public schools rages on.

The board heard public testimony on Wednesday about proposed changes to the eighth-grade science guidelines. As part of the proposed program, students are expected to learn how “natural events and human activity can impact the global climate”. Many of those who have testified say that there is nothing to be done about it, but the board of directors has voted in a preliminary fashion to keep the word in there.

On Tuesday, the board refused to adopt on a preliminary basis any college and high school health education materials that covered topics such as contraception, gender identity and self-harm. The board will take a final vote on the documents on Friday. If they do not approve of any of the texts, districts will need to research their own materials to teach the new health program standards approved last year.

All of this comes as the battle rages over what some claim is “inappropriate content” in public schools. Governor Abbott wants the board to remove books with “overtly sexual” content in school libraries and develop standards for what goes into libraries.

“There are already policies that every school district has regarding the selection of materials and the criteria for them. So it’s kind of a duplication of effort for the state board to weigh in with another set of criteria because it’s set as local board policy in every district in Texas, “said Carolyn Foote, school librarian. retired.

State Representative Matt Krause R-Forth Worth, who is also running for attorney general, recently identified 850 books he wants to review, most of which deal with race and sexuality.

“I think a lot of the controversy revolves around a particular book or two,” Foote said. “What might be good in a city like Houston or Austin, might be different if you’re in a small town in West Texas. This is why every council and local community makes these decisions about what is appropriate for their collection, as libraries not only support the program, but also support students’ recreational reading. And you know, we know the kids are that age in middle school, but especially in high school, when they’re just trying to figure out each other, they’re trying to figure out the world.

Click the video link above to watch our full interview with Foote.


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