Leeza Mangaldas on the decolonization of sexuality, pleasure and sexual well-being

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Often conversations about sexual pleasure and well-being invite judgment or shame. You may find yourself running out of reliable resources to address your concerns that go beyond medical investigation. Enter Leeza Mangaldas, a sex-positive designer using her social platforms to break stereotypes around sex. “People deserve access to accurate, non-judgmental information about sex, sexuality, and the body, so they can make safer, better, and more informed choices in their own lives,” says the creator and actor. vogue chats with Leeza Mangaldas about non-judgmental sex.

On the decolonization of sexuality

“Many of the dominating and shameful attitudes around sexuality that we cling to, as if they were our culture, are actually a colonial legacy. Our society has not always been so attached to a rigidly binary conception of gender, compulsory heterosexuality and shame around pleasure. It’s 2022, but we’re still obsessed with purity – an oppressive cornerstone of colonialism, not the necessary hallmark of Indian culture. In this part of the world, we We’ve long recognized that sexuality is a fluid, beautiful, festive part of life. Let’s decolonize our attitudes and reclaim our sex positivity.

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On the Gap of Conversations About Sexual Pleasure and Wellbeing in India

“As a young person navigating my own sexuality and sexual health, I felt there was a lack of easily accessible information and non-judgmental platforms to share questions and experiences, and obtain facts and resources. regarding sex, sexuality, gender, sexuality. health, relationships, and the body, let alone information that has been contextualized to India. As a young single woman, even accessing contraception or an STD test can feel like such an obstacle course, not to mention sexual pleasure, even though those are the basics of wellness.

On destroying shameful stereotypes and gender equality

“Unfortunately, sex is rarely talked about in an inclusive, inclusive and queer way in schools or even families – and if and when sex is talked about, like during the chapter on the reproductive system at school, or a parent’s superficial conversation, it is often a fear and shame-based approach that drives the conversation.Beyond the reproductive aspect, it is about pleasure.Include the discussion of pleasure in sex education leads in fact to greater receptivity of most audiences as well as better health outcomes Comprehensive sex education that does queer inclusive and inclusive pleasure is essential for greater gender equality, better sexual and reproductive health and rights, ending sexual and gender-based violence and achieving a safer, kinder and happier world.

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